Friday, July 10, 2009

You've Got Lies

I have run across this article quite a few time on some different blogs I frequent, and facebook. A friend and I were talking about how this was exactly what we wanted our daughters to know before they chose a husband. I personally feel like it is a great article, and really shows what is important when deciding to get married. I hope you enjoy it as well.

3 comments:

lostinrain said...

Interesting article. I don't completely agree with her interpretation of Jane Austin. Is this really what most women get out of Jane Austin stories? They only pay attention to the main characters? There are a lot of relationship issues to be gained from the supporting characters. What about the best friend in Pride and Prejudice that remains happily married to the dull cousin? And the complaint of basing marriage happiness on financial status needs to be looked at from a historical perspective. Women at the time had very different expectations of marriage than we do today. Marriages were not really considered partnerships the way they are today. Women had work to do. A young woman raised learning a certain set of skills would not be happy trying to do the things from another social class. Jane Austin wrote about mostly affluent or middle class people, and therefore they would rightfully marry someone affluent or middle class. A woman raised to navigate the complicated aspects of Victorian society, would not be happy scrubbing the floors and vise versa.

Otherwise, I agree that men and women have an unrealistic idea of marriage and what to look for in choosing a suitor. Also, we are at a disadvantage not having the of the "network of maiden Aunts" that know all about everyone and who would be an appropriate match for whom...

Haley Frederick said...

That is so true! I think that marriage has helped me realize the ridiculousness in chick-flicks. My counselor husband has helped, too. :)

lostinrain said...

I guess I should have said Regency society, but it was very similar to Victorian society and these couples would probably still be married when Victoria became queen 20 years later.